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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
Posts: 40
City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 11:58 am    Post subject: Great American loop preparation advice Reply with quote

My wife and I are gathering information and gear to start the great American loop on our new-to-us 22 cruiser in june 2020.

My priorities are safety, redundancy and peace of mind - of course creature comforts are not far behind!
This concerns docking, anchoring, dinghy/kicker, and refrigeration.

A lot of the discussions on the C-brat forums seem to be more PNW specific or off-coast fishing specific and the great American loop discussions online concern much bigger and heavier boats.

I would like to throw out a few facts and plans. These are broad strokes!
Any feedback, advice, criticism would be greatly appreciated.

(first off I am having my two bilge pumps professionally upgraded: getting a new cockpit pump (1500g/m) and moving that one (1100g/m) amidship where there was an older one (800g/m) - new battery runs and each switched for manual override.)

- I have no dock lines.
I plan to get 3/8in. breaded: 2 @ 25ft and 2 @ 15ft.
Should I get more lines? longer or shorter?

- I plan to anchor a lot.
I have a 15lbs delta with 3ft of chain and 90ft of 1/2in. rode.
I plan to get 25ft of 1/4in. rated at 2,600lbs.

I also have a 9lbs delta with no chain and 90ft of 1/2in. rode.
should I get another 25 ft of chain for this one or less would do?

Should I get a new primary anchor like a fancy Rocna (a 14lbs would suffice from their chart. Is this overkill or good peace of mind?)

-My boat has no factory deck pipe and I wonder about the practicality of the chain and rode on-deck...)

Should I skip the pipe and go for a windlass? I am able bodied and not afraid of a little manual labor but I'm not sure about having a strapped down milk crate on the bow with almost 20lbs of chain + rode.
Milk-crate? deck-pipe? windlass? (no $ more $ even more $)

-I've been filling my head with all the great forums re. dinghies and kickers.
My plan is one of the many many compromises:
Get a 8'6" or so inflatable-floor dinghy that weighs around 50lbs.
Get a short-shaft 6hp outboard.

The dinghy will live on the roof, it will be rowed most of the time (apparently the inflatable floor ones row the best)
The motor will live on the transom as a half-decent get home kicker if TowboatUS is slow coming and/or emergency anchoring is not possible...
I do like the idea of a planing dinghy for longer outings and errands.
a non-planing dinghy seems like a missed opportunity.

-Last but not least is the refrigeration question.
Invest in a portable fridge and a couple of flexible solar panels and hope for sunshine or run the engine or get a high-end cooler and spend time and money hunting down ice bags every few day?
"keep it simple sailor" points to the cooler but how much of a chore will it be to hunt for ice?
PS. The boat has 30Amp shore power with a battery charger but I plan on staying at marinas about once a week.

Again, In kow this is a lot for a single thread but bare in mind this is specifically for a Great American loop journey! and if any one has blunt advice like "that's not enough chain" or "you need more dock line than that" or you're crazy thinking ice will be readily available on the loop" that is a great starting point for more research. any more in-depth advice would be icing on the cake!

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DavidM



Joined: 24 Dec 2017
Posts: 162
City/Region: Punta Gorda
State or Province: FL
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:37 pm    Post subject: Re: Great American loop preparation advice Reply with quote

Lots of good questions. My answers are in bold below:

sebastien wrote:
My wife and I are gathering information and gear to start the great American loop on our new-to-us 22 cruiser in june 2020.

My priorities are safety, redundancy and peace of mind - of course creature comforts are not far behind!
This concerns docking, anchoring, dinghy/kicker, and refrigeration.

A lot of the discussions on the C-brat forums seem to be more PNW specific or off-coast fishing specific and the great American loop discussions online concern much bigger and heavier boats.

I would like to throw out a few facts and plans. These are broad strokes!
Any feedback, advice, criticism would be greatly appreciated.

(first off I am having my two bilge pumps professionally upgraded: getting a new cockpit pump (1500g/m) and moving that one (1100g/m) amidship where there was an older one (800g/m) - new battery runs and each switched for manual override.) Sounds good!

- I have no dock lines.
I plan to get 3/8in. breaded: 2 @ 25ft and 2 @ 15ft.
Should I get more lines? longer or shorter? 3/8" works fine for me. Think about getting two pairs of these for tieing up to piles: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XBD3U0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

- I plan to anchor a lot.
I have a 15lbs delta with 3ft of chain and 90ft of 1/2in. rode.
I plan to get 25ft of 1/4in. rated at 2,600lbs.

I also have a 9lbs delta with no chain and 90ft of 1/2in. rode.
should I get another 25 ft of chain for this one or less would do? I rarely if ever have used two anchors at the same time.

Should I get a new primary anchor like a fancy Rocna (a 14lbs would suffice from their chart. Is this overkill or good peace of mind?) I like the Rocna (or Manson Supreme or Spade) a lot. It sets much better than the Delta.

-My boat has no factory deck pipe and I wonder about the practicality of the chain and rode on-deck...) It is easy enough to add one and I would. As you note, it keeps the deck clean. Have one on my boat with a 7 lb Danforth and 20' of chain followed by nylon.

Should I skip the pipe and go for a windlass? I am able bodied and not afraid of a little manual labor but I'm not sure about having a strapped down milk crate on the bow with almost 20lbs of chain + rode.
Milk-crate? deck-pipe? windlass? (no $ more $ even more $) I once rented a 31' Camano treawler with a 20 lb Delta and 1/4" chain. A little tough to manage with no windlass, but doable. A lighter Rocna or similar with 25 of chain should be easy to pull in by hand.

-I've been filling my head with all the great forums re. dinghies and kickers.
My plan is one of the many many compromises:
Get a 8'6" or so inflatable-floor dinghy that weighs around 50lbs.
Get a short-shaft 6hp outboard.

The dinghy will live on the roof, it will be rowed most of the time (apparently the inflatable floor ones row the best)
The motor will live on the transom as a half-decent get home kicker if TowboatUS is slow coming and/or emergency anchoring is not possible...
I do like the idea of a planing dinghy for longer outings and errands.
a non-planing dinghy seems like a missed opportunity.

I suspect you will be towing your dinghy most of the time. A roll up with inflatable floor is a good choice. 6 hp might plane it with one aboard. Add a Doel Fin and/or flatter prop to help it get up on plane.

-Last but not least is the refrigeration question.
Invest in a portable fridge and a couple of flexible solar panels and hope for sunshine or run the engine or get a high-end cooler and spend time and money hunting down ice bags every few day?
"keep it simple sailor" points to the cooler but how much of a chore will it be to hunt for ice?
PS. The boat has 30Amp shore power with a battery charger but I plan on staying at marinas about once a week. A portable Engle fridge should work ok with about 100 watts of panels on your roof. Engles are high efficiency and use 30-40 AHs a day. A 100 watt panel should keep up with that load ok.

You didn't ask about batteries. If room is tight go with a Group 27 starting battery and a 100 AH Group 31 house battery, both AGM. If you have the room, instead of the G 31, use two GC2 golf cart batteries wired in series for the house. Gives you 220 AHs. If you go a week between marina visits you have to rely on solar and the O/B for charging. I don't have any experience with long term cruising with an O/B (only I/Bs) but my 70hp Yamaha will put out about 10A. A 100 watt solar panel and 4-5 hrs of cruising every 2-3 days should keep up with your power useage fine.

Again, In know this is a lot for a single thread but bare in mind this is specifically for a Great American loop journey! and if any one has blunt advice like "that's not enough chain" or "you need more dock line than that" or you're crazy thinking ice will be readily available on the loop" that is a great starting point for more research. any more in-depth advice would be icing on the cake!
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ssobol



Joined: 27 Oct 2012
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C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: SoBELLE
Photos: SoBelle
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 2:05 pm    Post subject: Re: Great American loop preparation advice Reply with quote

sebastien wrote:
...
Should I skip the pipe and go for a windlass? I am able bodied and not afraid of a little manual labor but I'm not sure about having a strapped down milk crate on the bow with almost 20lbs of chain + rode.
Milk-crate? deck-pipe? windlass? (no $ more $ even more $)
...


Don't see a problem with the weight in a milk crate on the bow. When we haul up our anchor, the rode is left on the front deck to dry out before sending it down the hole. Whether the rode is in the hole or in a crate on deck, the weight is pretty much in the same place on the boat. You will also find that the more weight up front the better (within reason).

When doing the loop, you are never that far from shore or civilization. The only time you need to worry about getting caught out in the weather is when you are on the Great Lakes (mostly Lake Michigan). Even then, there is a harbor about every 20 miles or so (at least down the east side of the lake).

I would have a least two longer mooring lines (at least 40'). The CD 22 is a pretty small boat. If you get stuck in a larger slip you may find that you cannot tie all 4 corners of the boat with "normal" length lines. I often find I have to use long lines to tie the bow or the offside of the boat.

If your boat doesn't already have them, converting the under berth areas to storage is a very worthwhile mod. There is lots of space to store stuff there.
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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
Posts: 40
City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the input DavidM

Yes of course, fender boards and more fenders for sure.

I forgot about finger piers with pylons,

As far as the two anchors, I’m thinking in case I loose one or really need to anchor in a sever shifting current (Bahamian mooring).

I’m looking into the deck pipes - it seems most C-dorys have them.

I would have though a 6 hp would plane a 8’6” lighter inflatable pretty well even with 2 (fairly light adults).

thanks for the precise advice on the Engel portable fridge.. lots more to learn about all that…

The boat has 2 Group 29, 845 MCA, Flooded Lead Acid batteries from 2018 that are in really good shape..

The fridge / solar question is also one of budget of course - so much more to learn and investigate…

thanks again for your feedback.
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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
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City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks you for YOUR input SoBelle,

When I noticed this C-dory didn’t have the deck pipe I was actually relived because I’ve heard of them leaking or the little drain in the locker not draining properly but mostly I was thinking of the wet chain etc. being in the living space up there so you bring up a good point re. drying the rode on deck before sending it down when possible.. this is the kind of little insights I love and find so easy to overlook when thinking from land!

We are planning on going along the East side of Lake Michigan toward Chicago so the proximity of harbors is good news indeed.

I understand what you are saying about having two more longer mooring lines it’s added to my list for sure.

I didn’t bring up the potential for opening up the v-berth for storage because I felt I was already addressing a lot of things but since you bring it up…

my model boat doesn’t seem to have foam or very little foam - it sounds hollow when I nock in various places.
I still have mixed feelings about getting rid of some emergency buoyancy up there…
most people on C-brats seem to feel it’s an upgrade.
the extra storage and bow weight are indeed very alluring.

thanks again for your input
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Pat Anderson



Joined: 02 Nov 2003
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C-Dory Year: 2005
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Daydream
Photos: Daydream and Crabby Lou
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We and a few others have actually done the Great Loop in a C-Dory. Jonathan Arthur on his CD22 Salty is the all-time champ, I think he is currently on his fourth Loop, or perhaps he has recently finished it. We cruised the Loop over 8 months in our CD25 Cruiser. We started on April 1 and finished on November 13, 2017. I blogged every day, and you may find some useful information in our blog. The URL for the blog is below in our signature.

Looking at your questions, the only thing I would stress is that if you intend to anchor much at all, you really should get a windlass. You should have chain at a minumum equal to the length of your boat, I would suggest 25 feet, and more rode than you think you will need, 8 plait, spliced to your chain with a taper splice. The chandlery where you buy the rode and chain can do or sub out the splice. Make sure the rode is a size compatible with your windless. Most of the Great Loop is not very deep but some places are, and if you want a reasonable scope, you should have at least 100 feet of rode and 150 feet would be better. Trying to anchor for hundreds of nights with chain and rode on the bow pulled by hand would soon become VERY tiresome. Our choice of anchor for the Loop was a Rocna because it sets and holds well in nearly any kind of bottom, and it worked extremely well for us.

One other suggestion, the best plan for navigation is to use an iPad running Aqua Map. Mount it in a RAM mount, they are really the best. Play with Aqua Map a little in your home waters to see how it works before starting the Loop. Be sure to turn on Active Captain in the Aqua Map settings and download the AC data. We also had Skipper Bob guides, which are inexpensive and contain some useful information. We actually consulted both Active Captain and Skipper Bob every day as we planned for the following day to decide how far to go and where to stop.

You can PM us with any specific questions if you like, we will respond!

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DAYDREAM - CD25 Cruiser
CRABBY LOU - CD16 Angler
Pat & Patty Anderson, and Baxter! C-Brat # 62!

http://daydreamsloop.blogspot.com
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Two Bears



Joined: 07 Nov 2009
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City/Region: Orofino, Idaho
State or Province: ID
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Two Bears
Photos: Two Bears
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In 2011 my wife and I decided we should look seriously at doing the loop. We attended the Great Loopers fall convention, held in mid-late October on the Tennessee River. About 300 people attended divided into three “classes”: 1) those Planning to do the loop, 2) those currently “doing” the loop, and 3) those who had completed one or more loops. After three days of the convention we joined five “looper” boats to travel up the river to Chattanooga, TN. To say we learned a lot is a bit of an understatement like saying the ocean is big. We learned a lot about east coast boating and fixed docks which are unknown here in the west. It really helped a lot in our later trips. We came home with a few thoughts.
a. Most of the big boaters were fascinated by our “trailerable” boat. They talked about the endless days of grinding along through un-inspiring country to keep up their needed daily, weekly and monthly mileage quota. They talked about a few sections of the loop that are really memorable and how they would like to just go back and do those. Places that came up repeatedly were the Eire Canal, the two Canadian canals (Trent-Severn & Rideau), Georgian Bay and the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers.
b. The daily grind. You have some general guides as to dates. To meet those dates you have to grind out the miles. You must commit almost a full a year to doing the loop. Each year about 200-300 boats start the loop and each year about 100 finish. The reasons for not finishing range from health issues to finances to family needs and to boat failures. Talking to many and reading lots of blogs the boat failures/ problems are often an excuse to lay the boat up for next year or to put it on the market. To be fair, many of the finishers started the year before. Read the blogs and understand the daily grind. I’d suggest Pat Anderson’s blog about their loop done a C-D 25 a few years ago @ https://daydreamsloop.blogspot.com/ Hopefully Pat will chime in here later.
We ended up deciding to trailer to many of the places on the loop and have done several 4-month trips in our CD 22. A full year or even 10 months was more that we were willing to be away from home. If its at all possible I suggest a CD-25 rather than a 22 = remember you are LIVING aboard for nearly a full year.
Regarding your specific questions I will respond to a few. I am one who removed the foam from our 22 and don’t regret it one bit. Lots more storage. Anchoring: You need chain: I just moved to a windlass but for most years I used 20 feet of 3/8 chain in front of half inch nylon rode. That is a lot of weight to pull up but it really helps keep the anchor down in the mud working like you want it to do when the wind gets squirrelly and changes direction. Anchor locker or milk crate; hand pull or windlass: I like the clean looks of having the anchor line and chain stored below. I don’t think the amount of moisture added from the wet line in the anchor lockers is a significant concern in the Vee berth. I recently went to a windlass because dragging all that chain and anchor up was getting to be a bit much for my 80 yr old body. Even with a windlass you will need to give personal attention at the bow. When it is raining & blowing you don’t want to open the vee-berth hatch so you walk the side to the bow. You will remember those days when the wind kicked up and the rain came down regardless of hand or windlass. However, when you get back inside your body will appreciate the windlass.

In any case, have fun= that's what its all about.

Chuck

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gulfcoast john



Joined: 14 Dec 2012
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:53 pm    Post subject: cruise Reply with quote

Sebastien,

Congrads on your new ride. It’s a great trailer boat that you can trailer economically with an inexpensive truck at 65MPH anywhere in the continent 24/7 without a permit, right through a thunderstorm, while getting 15MPG or better (maybe much better, we got over 12 MPG today in a F250 towing close to 12,000#). If you trailer a very leisurely 500 miles a day (my limit, Eileen has no experience towing boats) you can reach any decent part of the Great Loop in 2-3 days while spending $20 to free per night boater-homing in campgrounds, state parks or truck plazas.

Pat & Patty on Daydream (whom we greatly respect) had a good reason to do the whole 6,000 mile tamale in one great big 6 -month gulp…they live 3,500 miles away in the PNW.

You live in Philly. You can trailer your boat to any point on the Loop in 1,300 miles (3 days max) and do any part of the loop one-way in a 2-6 week mini-bite by Enterprising back to your rig and trailering home.
I see no sensible reason (from your post) that you should swallow the whole thing at one time with all the extra complexities it would require (warm clothes AND cold clothes, heater AND AC, region-specific equipment, etc.) all piled into a 22 ft boat.
There is a reason the AVG Looper boat is 43 ft and takes 12 months (official AGLCA stat, we became members and you should too if you’re dead serious. The Ill river locks are all closed Sept 2020, which you learn about there, not here. You can’t get past them until they open whenever after rehab).
The lower Miss river is a 300 mile long nightmare for a C-Dory with fast currents, massive commercial barges to avoid, no place to anchor and no marinas, downright ugly scenery. The alternative is the 250 miles of the Tombigbee…as far as 250 mile long man-made ditches go, it is a 2 ditch on a Ditch scale of 5.

The Great Loop is an artifact invented by owners of boats that are too fat, too heavy, too wide, too big, and too slow to load on a trailer and take to the San Juans or Georgian Bay or the Trent Severn or anywhere a road can take you economically, quickly and conveniently to launch and enjoy the waterway for any number of weeks on your C-Dory.

The Loopers we have met on this adventure are all helpful, cheerful, skilled and hearty souls. No offense to them or to you. I’d advise you both look carefully at the alternative of doing ‘only the best of the Loop, and only in sections’ at your convenience.

In fact, after you get the anchor and dock lines, consider trailering over to the Erie canal past Waterford (those 5 locks require 3 hours to transit) and launch at some mom and pop marina with a ramp and (you must call…rig storage) to see the leaves turn colors and enjoy some beautiful fall weather while almost all of the loopers are gone. (Option 2, cruise up the Hudson if the weather is great).
Erie canal locks have only ropes for the fore and aft crew to hang onto, you both need gloves and a boat hook and a VHF radio on 13 fixed and aft, and 3 big fenders (8-10” diam for a 22) on each side. You may not have a choice on which side of the lock to tie to, so practice on both.
C-Otter (who has 4 weeks here), Mystery Girl and Tully B may also be exploring around there. PM C-Otter for advice, since he’s the meanest (just kidding!).

Best of luck on all your adventures, and our advice is to start your adventures ASAP, make them 2-4 weeks until you BOTH know you like longer, avoid complications like generators and dinghys until you know you need one, and HAVE FUN!

Best,
John

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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
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City/Region: philadelphia
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C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you so much for your help Pat, I remember looking at your blog quite a long time ago when I was still narrowing my boat choices and it got lost in the shuffle of great resources.
I will look through it again now that I am a C-dory owner.

I was planning on using the older GPS that came with the boat as mostly a backup and using an iPad with Navionics and of course the latest edition of skipper bob’s guides but now I will investigate Aquamap with active captain as another option.
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Avidmagnum12



Joined: 23 Mar 2013
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good replies Chuck and John. I just had someone ask me about doing the loop this morning when I was fueling up. I had to laugh ....I only made about 10 miles today! At that rate I’d never finish! I’ve had a great time stopping along the way and learning about the history and people. But others see it differently and that’s OK. I had a friend that took a “vacation” driving to the west coast and looking at the Pacific and then turned around and headed back to Wisconsin. Never stopped except for food and sleep. He loved it! Different strokes for different folks.........
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2011 CD 25 "C-Otter" 07/2015 to present
2011 CD 25 "My Girl" 06/2015 renamed C-Otter
2004 CD 22 Commuter "Out2C" 03/10 to 06/15
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ssobol



Joined: 27 Oct 2012
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2019 10:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

sebastien wrote:
Thanks you for YOUR input SoBelle,

When I noticed this C-dory didn’t have the deck pipe I was actually relived because I’ve heard of them leaking or the little drain in the locker not draining properly but mostly I was thinking of the wet chain etc. being in the living space up there so you bring up a good point re. drying the rode on deck before sending it down when possible.. this is the kind of little insights I love and find so easy to overlook when thinking from land!

We are planning on going along the East side of Lake Michigan toward Chicago so the proximity of harbors is good news indeed.

I understand what you are saying about having two more longer mooring lines it’s added to my list for sure.

I didn’t bring up the potential for opening up the v-berth for storage because I felt I was already addressing a lot of things but since you bring it up…

my model boat doesn’t seem to have foam or very little foam - it sounds hollow when I nock in various places.
I still have mixed feelings about getting rid of some emergency buoyancy up there…
most people on C-brats seem to feel it’s an upgrade.
the extra storage and bow weight are indeed very alluring.

thanks again for your input


Doing the Great Loop you are unlikely to anchor anywhere that requires multiple anchors at once ("bahamian anchor"). You are going to be in relatively shallow water (not PNW depths). When I anchor it is rarely more than 10' deep. In inland waters there is no tide change of current direction. The only reason to have multiple anchors is to have multiple types (fortress vs. plow) or as a spare in case you loose one or are forced to abandon one. Even then you can have Amazon deliver a replacement overnight to the next stop on your itinerary.

As for the berth, the buoyancy benefit of the foam in the berth is marginal. FWIW, later models of the CD22 come without foam and with hatches installed from the factory. My '08 22 had factory installed hatches for the berth compartments. If the factory decided that the foam in the berth is not required in later boats, I see no reason to keep it in yours.

Again, when doing the Great Loop you are going to be within sight of shore pretty much all the time. The water you are going to be in is probably less than 10' deep most of the time. It is not like you are doing a blue water crossing. Keep this in mind when thinking about contingencies.

You can add a bulkhead very easily to separate the anchor locker from the berth. I did it using PVC sheet from Home Depot. Not counting time for the paint to dry (my interior is painted) it is an afternoon's effort to do this.
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Micahbigsur@msn.com



Joined: 27 May 2019
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City/Region: Big Sur
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C-Dory Year: 2003
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Sierra
Photos: Sierra
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of good advice here. We pretty much only do long term cruising and we have had a lot of boats large and small. We have given up our sailboats for the ability to visit more areas with a trailerable boat, we think the CD 25 is a great size with enough room for a real head and enough room for day to day living.
One theme here is your anchoring system. I have had deltas in the past I am not a big fan. If you want want to to sleep well at night always go up a size, we loved our Spade but it may not be practical for you they can be hard to find and expensive. We like the roll bar Rocna but it was a bit unwieldy so we just changed over to a Rocna Vulcan which is similar to the Spade and it seems the best of both worlds. (Foto in our album). We expect to anchor in up to 25 feet and you need at least a boat length of chain, I like 5/16 G4 on these boats, it has enough weight to be effective and the you need 5, minimum 7, best length, of total rode times the water depth (25') so at least 125 feet of total rode most people carry 200 to 250 feet, this is all about sleeping good anywhere in any conditions. 8 or 12 braid 1/2" nylon will stow the best, my vote is as some others, with a windlass below deck out of the way.
We have had several Engel fridge/freezers, unlike some others they have been bullet proof, we have a nice new fridge so we use our current one as a freezer. I may be a bit different in that I think 150 watts of solar and 2 good deep cycle group 31s with 220 amp hours of batteries is a good minimum for multi-day anchoring, semi-flexible panels with Sun Power cells offer the most power with the least weight at the moment. A good quality MPPT controller will also give you the best efficiency.
I will give you a mixed review on your inflatable floor dingy plan, we had a 8'6" Achilles inflatable floor on our Ranger Tug and a 8'6' hard bottom folding transom with a pretty flat bottom on our big sailboat both would plane with a 6 horse and the two of us. But we felt they were both a bit heavy to put up on the roof each night for their security. The inflatable floor drove my clean freak nurse, ex boat captain wife crazy as it was so hard to keep clean with stuff always getting under the floor. I don't think any inflatables row worth a damn so we went back to a lightweight flat bottomed Zodiac for this boat.
Hope this helps and good luck with your plans!

On our Sierra upgrades; we just drove up to Alameda today and picked up our Spectra Ventura 200 watermaker, man that is one huge box... I hope it is mostly packing! I will start a photo album and a install thread as soon as I suss out how and where it will go.

_________________
Micah Curtis and Dana, RN
2003 C-dory 25 Sierra, 200, 9.9 and 2.5 Suzukis
2012 R25 SC Sequoia (2015-2018)
1978 Folkes 38 SV Audacious (2006-2015)
+ many more going back to my first boat a little trailerable Piver trimaran in 1969.
Micah, KJ6GUF, Dana, KJ6GXG
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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
Posts: 40
City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really appreciate your thoughts Two Bears,
“The daily grind” that is a great way of putting it re. the reality of spending a year on a boat not as a marina liveaboard..
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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
Posts: 40
City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

John from CAT O’ MINE, you sure bring up so great fundamental points about the great loop as a single journey when one has a trailerable boat and lives near all the great loop destinations.

It comes down to work, and time constraints..
We’ve taken a year off before (turned into 2 1/2!) to travel, do artist residencies, long-term home sitting and farm care-taking.
the big chunk of “time off” worked out great given our specific work/life/housing situation. So we will stick to that plan.. but I certainly see trailering the boat in the future (PNW?)

Thank you as well for the (to me) breaking news about the Illinois river lock closures coming up I will keep an eye on that and we may need to arrange a portage across those locks…
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sebastien



Joined: 07 Aug 2018
Posts: 40
City/Region: philadelphia
State or Province: PA
C-Dory Year: 2000
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Pompano
Photos: Pompano
PostPosted: Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom and Joyce from C-Otter,
Yes when it comes to travel. vacations and adventures we all certainly have our ideas of a good time.
As much as I love a good journey I do also love a destination, when
Iking, canoeing driving etc. a loop is always the way I want to go.
And so this loop…
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