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Deck hardware and sleeping in toilets: how tough is it?
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SnowTexan



Joined: 08 Aug 2019
Posts: 63
City/Region: Carlton
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Miss Maria
Photos: Miss Maria
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:18 pm    Post subject: Deck hardware and sleeping in toilets: how tough is it? Reply with quote

Well it happened again. It seems once every decade I am destined to sleep in a USFS pit toilet building. A potty shack. A latrine of divine engineering and exquisite execution. These venerable bastions of civility have more than twice saved my bacon, and last Friday was another such bacon saving. 2-3 Mph winds, they said...perhaps gusting to 5 mph. Clear to partly cloudy they said. Right.

About an hour to sundown I pulled into corral creek; hours from safety by water, and days by land. The wind was already approaching 10-15 and a rain/snow mix was coming down. I went ashore, gathered some wood and built a good fire. I cooked over the coals, put on a cup of tea, and noticed Miss Maria down at the dock bucking like a stolen pony with a howling wolf on her back. Well that made me want to cry right then and there for the old girl, but it got worse. The demons of the lake conjured their cliched washing machine, and Miss Mariaís thrashing continued. It became an outright beating as she struggled to free herself from the dock. Winds raged, water washed over the docks end, and I feared the deck hardware would not hold. Four fenders, four lines, and I realized
1. I was not sleeping on that boat safely
2. I donít know j@ck squat about securing a boat in foul weather
3. I had removed my bivy sack from the boat and not put it back after itís last adventure.

Well to keep this story from wandering let me just tell you, I can make a shelter and a fire anywhere With the right tools and under any conditions short of a hurricane. But why bother when there is a posh outhouse up the hill? I mean it has a roof, four walls, a locking door. Shoot it even has a bathroom. I cannot, even with my woodsy ways, manufacture such a quality shelter with a single poncho tarp and some 550 cord. I grabbed my sleeping bag and my safety gear, stuffed my pride in a pocket, and slept in that sucker until the wind let up in the wee hours. In that time I vowed to restock the boat with the bivy AND my 4 season tent for wilderness areas, to study the ways of making a boat secure like a new religion, and to ask the c-brats: just how much of a beating can that deck hardware take?

Thanks for any and all advice (other than ďdonít go out in winterĒ. Clearly that wonít stick...)

Note: I had an immersion suit on all day, pfd, and my locator beacon. The boat did FANTASTIC in the water. Never felt in any danger of my own person or for the boat until I hitched it to the dock.


Nigel
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SnowTexan



Joined: 08 Aug 2019
Posts: 63
City/Region: Carlton
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Miss Maria
Photos: Miss Maria
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Miss Maria is safe back in her home port. As am I.
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DayBreak



Joined: 16 Jul 2017
Posts: 225
City/Region: Monmouth, Or.
State or Province: OR
C-Dory Year: 2018
C-Dory Model: 23 Venture
Vessel Name: DayBreak
Photos: DayBreak
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nigel,

Don't worry about Miss Maria. She is one tough girl. Most people underestimate the seaworthiness and toughness of a C-Dory vessel. Miss Maria has a top deck that is 3/4 inch thick with deck hardware that includes 5 through bolted SS cleats. She will be faithful to keep safe you safe and comfortable on the water for your lifetime!
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NORO LIM



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 678
City/Region: Olympia
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 23 Venture
Vessel Name: NORO LIM (sold 12/12/14)
Photos: NORO LIM
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any Portty in a storm, I guess. Glad you and the boat are OK. Some excitement, eh?

Spring lines and fenders. Lots of them. And a fail-safe extra long bow line to a big tree on shore. I think your boat's cleats are probably not going to fail. I've been concerned about the sturdiness of some docks, however! I haven't been there in a couple of years, but I think that dock you were at is pretty sturdy. About 20 years ago, my brother and I spent a mostly sleepless night in a tent watching my CD-16 bounce around like a crazy cork at a park dock a little north of where you were. We were the only people there, so I had lines running everywhere to keep the boat secure without pounding itself to bits against the dock. At one point I seriously thought the boat might end up on top of the dock. I kept adjusting things to allow enough but not too much motion. All night I worried that the wind would change direction and necessitate major retying.

Those northerlies howling down the lake are really something. We were on the lake in January a half dozen years or so ago during a pretty good blow. Here's a shot from that trip - It's the Park Service boat trying to get to Stehekin.


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Bill, Formerly on NORO LIM
2001 CD 16, 2001-2006
2006 CC 23, 2006-2014
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thataway



Joined: 02 Nov 2003
Posts: 17483
City/Region: Pensacola
State or Province: FL
C-Dory Year: 2007
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: thataway
Photos: Thataway
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Love the outhouse part of the story. I probably would have stuck with the boat...but always hard to second guess (having never slept in an outhouse..)

I agree that these boats are mighty tough! It would take several thousand pounds to pull the cleats out. You made out better than some boats I know of under those conditions... Glad you are safely home...

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Bob Austin
Thataway
Thataway (Ex Seaweed) 2007 25 C Dory May 2018
Thisaway 2006 22' CDory November 2011 to May 2018
Caracal 18 140 Suzuki 2007 to present
Thataway TomCat 255 150 Suzukis June 2006 thru August 2011
C Pelican; 1992, 22 Cruiser, 2002 thru 2006
Frequent Sea; 2003 C D 25, 2007 thru 2009
KA6PKB
Home port: Pensacola FL
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Chester



Joined: 04 Sep 2006
Posts: 1123
City/Region: home
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2005
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Chester
PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lake Chelan is a lively little pony, that's for sure.
I've read accounts of C-Dorys being deliberately lifted by their cleats by the factory.
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localboy



Joined: 30 Sep 2006
Posts: 4336
City/Region: Lake Stevens via Honolulu
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2007
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: 'Au Kai (Ocean Traveler)
Photos: 'AU KAI
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just posted another thread about the Beachcomber Marina on Vancouver island. The marina took a beating...from wind & water. So yeah, things can go "sideways" really quickly. Glad you made it safely. And yeah, I would not be above sleeping in an outhouse if I had to.
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Wife to her husband pointing @ us...from the bow of their 50-footer; Prideaux Haven 2013
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Yakmandu



Joined: 03 Nov 2017
Posts: 38
City/Region: Lake Lanier
State or Province: GA
C-Dory Year: 2005
C-Dory Model: 19 Angler
Vessel Name: Pops GO!
Photos: Pops GO!
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad you found a warm dry place. I feel for your dock line fears. Iíve spent far too many hours getting my lines just right...

Bathrooms are underrated as sleeping quarters! Hereís a pro tip - position your self directly under the hand dryer. When you get cold, that warm air sure feels good!

I spent a cold night in the Everglades City ranger station bathroom during a Watertribe race a few years ago. I was too tired to pull my tent out of my kayak - and the bathroom was WARM!

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Patrick Rohde
Pops GO!
Lake Lanier, GA
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jkswor



Joined: 23 Jun 2011
Posts: 108
City/Region: tok
State or Province: AK
C-Dory Year: 2007
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Missy marie
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 9:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glad you had a dock and can beach your boat to put up a tent. Up here in prince William sound there are no docks once you leave the harbor, and if you beach your boat to go ashore to put up a tent, your boat will really be beached due to the low tides. Not to mention being stranded with the bears. Only way we can get to shore is with a dingy which would be blown away in a good blow. Iím sticking with the boat. I try to find a cove somewhere and anchor. Even then Iíve had the anchor pulled by the wind. Good luck
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rbfconstruction



Joined: 19 Sep 2017
Posts: 117
City/Region: huntington beach
State or Province: CA
Photos: Angler Management
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 9:51 am    Post subject: deck hardware and sleeping in toilets Reply with quote

Glad you are back and safe. You should be a writer. I must admit, I had a different vision of "miss Maria " as you described her (until I realized "she" was your boat. Smile
Also, usually rooms with an on suite tend to be a bit more pricy. Sounds to me like you found a real deal.
by the way, I went out in the fog for the first time Saturday. (50 ft. visibility)
Made it to my favorite fishing spot to find 15 boats ahead of me.

Richard
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hardee



Joined: 30 Oct 2006
Posts: 10432
City/Region: Sequim
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2005
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Sleepy-C
Photos: SleepyC
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nigil, the first rule of survival is to use what you have. You did. As mentioned, these boats are built pretty stout. Builds your confidence in "Miss Maria" right?

Sure glad you are using and enjoying your boat.

Harvey
SleepyCMoon

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Robert H. Wilkinson



Joined: 26 Jan 2011
Posts: 961
City/Region: Port Ryerse
State or Province: ON
C-Dory Year: 2009
C-Dory Model: 22 Angler
Vessel Name: Romakeme IV
Photos: Robert H. (Name TBD)
PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 6:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NORO LIM wrote:
Spring lines and fenders. Lots of them. And a fail-safe extra long bow line to a big tree on shore.


Nigel, enjoyed your story!

Re. securing dock lines in foul weather - Bill has some good advise here. If you have ever watched videos of boats being towed it is usually the snap when a line comes taught when something breaks. I noticed when I was on the USCGC Mackinaw they had something that kept constant pressure on the line used for towing(not sure how it worked).

Normally positioned dock lines only allow for limited up/down motion. If you leave them too slack the boat will move away from it then slam back into it. The spring lines transform a lot of the up/down motion into fore/aft motion while keeping the boat closer to the dock.

Elastic snubbers on your dock lines also absorb a lot of the shock. Nothing less than half inch quality lines in good repair. I stayed in a marina last summer and this was one of their rules.

I have also found it beneficial to bring a stern line from the off dock cleat across the boat to the dock cleat. This allows for more up/down motion while keeping the boat closer to the dock.

Weights can also be hung from the bottom of fenders to keep them from riding up and flipping over the gunwale.

Regards,

Rob

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NORO LIM



Joined: 24 Apr 2008
Posts: 678
City/Region: Olympia
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2006
C-Dory Model: 23 Venture
Vessel Name: NORO LIM (sold 12/12/14)
Photos: NORO LIM
PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I always carried one of these Taylor Made Fender Cushions.

I got the size that fit snuggly in my Alaska series dinghy and used it as a seat instead of the rigid board that came with the boat. (This also made flipping the dinghy upside down to store on the cabin roof much less likely to scratch the gel coat.) The cushion found multiple uses besides being a dinghy seat and boat fender. It was great for sitting on in the cockpit if you wanted to stay low and out of the wind.

Its most important work, however, was providing serious boat protection if rafting up with another boat or if tied to a dock in a bad weather. It won't roll and it tends not to ride up the way cylindrical fenders can.

I agree completely about using the offside stern cleat, and triangles are better than rectangles when it comes to dock lines. Especially in rough weather, you do not want short straight ties from boat to dock.

Bill
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hardee



Joined: 30 Oct 2006
Posts: 10432
City/Region: Sequim
State or Province: WA
C-Dory Year: 2005
C-Dory Model: 22 Cruiser
Vessel Name: Sleepy-C
Photos: SleepyC
PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Totally agree with Bill, long lines are better. More room for stretch (read shock relief). Triangles are good. Try not to have all the lines out and not use all the cleats -- spread the load around on the boat.

And of course, the obvious, if at all possible, you want to be on the downwind,(lee) side of the dock.

Bill, what a great idea to use those fenders as seats in the inflatable. Thank you.

Harvey
SleepyCMoon
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thataway



Joined: 02 Nov 2003
Posts: 17483
City/Region: Pensacola
State or Province: FL
C-Dory Year: 2007
C-Dory Model: 25 Cruiser
Vessel Name: thataway
Photos: Thataway
PostPosted: Tue Feb 11, 2020 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bill great idea for the dinghy "seat" cushion.

Another trick to keep the boat off the dock is to drop an anchor either abeam, and tie to amid ships cleat (by window) or if you have 2 extra cleats on the bow (outboard, under the railing)--forward of the beam, and an take a second line to something on shore (or a buried anchor), to hold the boat well off the dock. We have two sets of dock lines: One is 5/16, and our "normal tie up lines". But we have 4 1/2" and even several 5/8" "Storm" dock lines. The normal lines can act as snubbers, as we leave the heavier lines slightly more slack. This takes some of the shock load off the heavier lines, and decreases stress. I have used the beam anchor on larger boats up to 62 feet. Also gives a way to pull off the dock if the wind tends to pin you down.
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